Intellispect Home Page
     

    Texas Real Estate Commission      (TREC) Professional Inspector
     License # 6216

     International Code Council (ICC)
     Code-certified Residential     
     Building Inspector
     License # 5277997-B1

     Code-certified Residential      Mechanical Inspector
     License # 5277997-M1

     Texas Association of
     Real Estate Inspectors
     (TAREI) member

   TAREI



Builder's Warranty

End-of-builder-Warranty Inspection
FAQ

Is your one-year warranty about to expire with your builder?

An end-of-builder-warranty inspection will provide you with what may be your last chance to correct defects at your builder’s expense.

Intellispect Property Inspection Group is the local leader in the new home inspection market (pre-pour inspections, framing inspections, final inspections and end-of-builder-warranty inspections). We inspect hundreds of homes annually that are at the end of their builder warranty. We have a 100% satisfaction ratio on these inspections. We have hundreds of testimonials and references available from owners of homes ranging from 1400 square feet to over 11,000 square feet. Intellispect specializes in conducting these inspections that focus on areas where major repairs and safety hazards may occur.

Most homeowners let their one-year anniversary slip by without holding the builder accountable for repairs that need to be made. It is unbelievable that people will spend hundreds of thousands (sometimes millions) of dollars on a house and then rely only on the word of their builder and on an inspection by an overworked public servant (municipal inspector), with no legal liability responsibility.

Our inspectors are code-certified by the International Code Council (ICC), the same organization that writes the code that residential home builders must follow. Less than 5% of Texas home inspectors have this certification. When performing end-of-builder-warranty inspections, most inspectors follow the Texas Real Estate Commission standards, standards that were developed for the inspection of existing homes.  Intellispect inspects to new residential construction standards based on the ICC International Residential Code. All issues are meticulously documented both narratively and with digital pictures to visually show the problem and their exact location. The IntelliReport© has evolved over the years to be a complete document that can be used to show the builder and contractors the issue and the location. It can then be used as a reference to assure repairs have been made. In extreme cases the document has been used in arbitration or other legal proceedings.

Frequently Asked Questions

My builder says that the municipal inspector passed the house on all inspections. Isn't this enough?

My builder says that a third-party inspector passes the house. Isn't this enough?

What sorts of issues are commonly found on end-of-builder warranty inspections?

When should I turn my inspection report in to the builder and how should I turn it in?

Is my builder required to fix the issues that surface during the inspection?

How long does the inspection take?

What sort of qualifications should I look for in an inspector?

How much does the inspection cost?

My builder says that the municipal inspector passed the house on all inspections. Isn't this enough?

A municipal inspector’s main function is to ensure that the building meets “minimum” model code requirements and thereby provides fire and life safety standards for the occupants. Most municipal inspectors are International Code Council (ICC) certified professionals that do the best they can under the present conditions. They are highly trained and want to do the best job possible. Now for the reality of their “conditions”: Municipal inspectors report to work every day and are given an average of 15-25 inspections to perform. Given that they work 8-hour days with a 30-minute lunch break and two 15-minute breaks, there is not much time per inspection. Let’s not forget to figure in travel time between inspections. Every competent municipal inspector voices the same frustrations; excessive demands and tight time constraints. Luckily for them, municipal inspectors have liability immunity except in the case of gross negligence. Most municipal inspector’s leave the truck running, get out and check their “personal” favorites among inspection items. They do not (ever) do the following: circuit test every outlet for grounding and polarity, check every door and window for proper function, check all plumbing for leaks and proper function, get on the roof, walk the attic, check all siding, check for proper sealant, check appliances for function, run sprinkler system, etc., etc., etc.
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My builder says that a third-party inspector passed the house. Isn’t this enough?

The third-party inspector works for and is paid for by the builder. If any third-party inspector took the time to inspect all the issues Intellispect looks for, they would not be in business long. Their business model is based on volume inspections at low prices. They are in and out of the inspection and leave a carbon-copy of the (one-page in most cases) report. If their inspector put down all the issues reported on an Intellireport©, they would be fired almost immediately for “creating” too much work for the builder. Let’s face it; most builders have their pride hurt when multiple issues are documented. They are not happy paying an inspector to point out their deficiencies and lack of quality control. Third-party inspectors know this and act accordingly.
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What sorts of issues are commonly found on end-of-builder warranty inspections?

The most common issues are roofing defects and improper installation, electrical wiring mistakes and safety concerns, water intrusion issues on exterior envelope, sprinkler issues, lot drainage, gas leaks, plumbing leaks, inadequate cooling and improper framing. See an example warranty inspection report. There are many, many issues that are not as common but are seen on a regular basis.
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When should I turn my inspection report in to the builder and how should I turn it in?

The report can be turned in anytime prior to the anniversary of the close of escrow. If you do not know this date, call your builder and ask. It is a good idea for them to know you are going to provide them with an inspection report. They can tell you the proper place to send report and the accepted forms (printed report, email, etc.). Do not be surprised if they try and tell you it is not necessary to have an inspection performed by a qualified and code-certified inspector (this should be reason enough to have one done).
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Is my builder required to fix the issues that surface during the inspection?

There are specific state requirements in regards to builder warranty issues. The builder must adhere to these standards. These standards are mandated by the Texas Residential Construction Commission (TRCC) and can be viewed on their web site. All issues documented by Intellispect were believed to be significant by the inspector, based on experience and knowledge of what damage continued neglect of the issue may cause. Obvious cosmetic issues are not the focus of the report, although certain cosmetic issues will be reported (e.g. missing paint). Intellispect is responsible only for the reporting of issues, not for their repair. Even if a builder does not fix an issue, it is always better that the homeowner be aware of it should they want to make repairs. Many of the issues found have not been around long enough to cause significant damage (yet) and may be relatively inexpensive to repair.
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How long does the inspection take?

Most homes take between three and four hours to inspect and one to two hours to assemble report (write narrative report and incorporate pictures into proper sections). Most reports are written at the office and are delivered electronically within two business days (unless prior expediting arrangements are made).
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What sort of qualifications should I look for in an inspector?

Always hire an inspector based on qualifications, not on cost. Price is important but should not be the overriding factor. Most people buy the home they are in because the company had the right mix of reputation, qualifications and features they were looking for at a price that was fair for what they were getting. Hiring an inspector should be the same. Look for inspection experience and competence above everything else. Of course you should also hire someone that knows how to write a report that combines the technical aspect of the issues with a straightforward method of explaining it so that a non-inspector client can understand it. Ask questions; get a feel for the personality of the inspector. Is he a know-it-all (this business attracts them like a Herculean strength magnet)? Do you get along with him? Ask how many warranty inspections he has performed. Do not fall for the “I have x years of construction experience” line. This is not only untrue in most cases but even if it was, it means absolutely nothing. Defect recognition experience and code related inspection experience cannot be replaced with any other kind of experience.
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How much does the inspection cost?

The cost of the inspection is directly relevant to the size of the home. The average 3000 square foot home inspection costs about $450. Obviously, this includes the inspection and the report writing. What is not so obvious is that it also includes the experience of over 8500 completed inspections, over 300 hours of continuing education, over 14 years of foundation inspection experience, framing experience, code-certification training and the commitment and knowledge to perform the best inspection in the industry. This is a cheap price to pay for the experience and knowledge you will be getting. It is less than one plumbing fixture upgrade, is that too much to pay for the safety of your family and the peace of mind of knowing your house is safe and up to building standard? Contact us now to schedule this most important inspection.
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